Motor(Sport)

Formula One needs to embrace it’s core principal. It is fundamentally competitive. A sport.

When you look at other sports, the source of excitement is the expectation, the unknown aspect of competition. Of course there will be ways of predicting potential results, but the fact is you don’t know who will win until the event is over.

The human element is a huge part of this excitement. People make mistakes.

F1 doesn’t have that human aspect. The engineering involved in the cars is so advanced that the drivers have become a minor factor.

This advance in technology has saturated motorsport, particularly Formula One, which has come to rely hugely upon technology both on and off the track. The teams are almost infallible. Mistakes aren’t made because they have a resolution for all eventualities.

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Where races are won and lost

This is a problem that cuts right to the heart of Formula One in particular. As already discussed, sport should be exciting. But the excitement is lost if we know what’s going to happen. If the result is controlled to an extent that it is already decided with half a race still to go, then why would we watch the final thirty or so laps?

Only a handful of times in a twenty-one race F1 season has a race been in the balance coming towards the closing stages. This is no good when fans are looking for entertainment. There needs to be that human element, the potential for things to go wrong. It needs to be exciting.

Simon Ostler

I am currently training to become a Journalist. I write best when my subject is something I enjoy. I have spent time working with CAR Magazine and Parkers.

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3 Responses

  1. December 5, 2016

    […] the fans. The drivers understand this, and put on a show that provides far more excitement than is currently possible in strictly controlled FIA events. A ticket to Goodwood is more exciting for me than a ticket to […]

  2. January 9, 2017

    […] season. They may not improve the action on track but the new regulations could at least promote more competition in terms of overall performance. Looking at the top three teams as it stood at the end of last […]

  3. January 9, 2017

    […] season. They may not improve the action on track but the new regulations could at least promote more competition in terms of overall performance. Looking at the top three teams as it stood at the end of last […]

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